What is plant description hareer plant?

Common Name:       HAREER

Botanical name:       Terminalia chebula

Family:                         Combretaceae

Plant description

Morphological characteristics

Chebulic myrobalan is a large tree with umbrella-shaped crown and crowded branches, growing up to 25 m in height, with a bole girth of 2.5 m.

Stem bark is dark brown.

Leaves are sub-opposite, ovate or oblong-ovate, 8–20 cm long, and deciduous during the cold season.

The species is identified by dark brown bark exfoliating in irregular woody scales and by the presence of a pair of large glands at the top of the petiole.

Floral characteristics

Flowers are yellowish-white and emit a strong offensive odor.

They occur in spikes arising from upper axils or in small terminal panicles.

Fruit (drupe) is yellowish-green, obovoid or ellipsoid, hard, and five to six ribbed when dry. A seed is globose, generally 2–6 cm long, and pale yellow in color.

Flowering occurs in May–June, while fruiting occurs in winter (November–March).

Distribution

The species is found mostly in mixed dry deciduous forests and is frequent in tropical and subtropical zones, mostly in hilly tracks.

The plant prefers a tropical environment, ascending in the sub-Himalayas zones up to an elevation of 1500 m.

Climate and soil

In the natural habitat of the species, temperature ranges between 36 °C and 45 °C, and rainfall ranges from 1200 mm to 3000 mm per annum.

It is capable of growing on different types of soils but attains the best development on loose well-drained soils, such as sandy loam as well as clayey loam.

It grows in open areas in the forest, forming top to the middle canopy.

Propagation material

A seed is the most appropriate material for this plant’s propagation.

Fruit is collected in summer in May–June.

Generally, two good years are followed by one or two poor ones.

Fruits are collected when they turn yellow.

The seeds can be collected as soon as they fall on the ground, and are dried under shade. The seeds can be stored in gunny bags for one year, but fresh seeds germinate quicker.

Therapeutic Uses

The hareer fruit is antiseptic, diuretic, astringent, cardiotonic, and febrifuge in action.

It is a safe and effective purgative, laxative, and alternative.

It is an important ingredient of ‘triphyla’, an Ayurvedic formulation used in the treatment of constipation, colic pain and kidney dysfunctions, eye diseases, and sore throat.

Unripe fruits are more purgative and the ripe ones are astringent.

Common Name:       HAREER

Botanical name:       Terminalia chebula

Family:                       Combretracae

Plant description

Morphological characteristics

Chebulic myrobalan is a large tree with umbrella-shaped crown and crowded branches, growing up to 25 m in height, with a bole girth of 2.5 m.

Stem bark is dark brown.

Leaves are sub-opposite, ovate or oblong-ovate, 8–20 cm long, and deciduous during the cold season.

The species is identified by dark brown bark exfoliating in irregular woody scales and by the presence of a pair of large glands at the top of the petiole.

Floral characteristics

Flowers are yellowish-white and emit a strong offensive odor.

They occur in spikes arising from upper axils or in small terminal panicles.

Fruit (drupe) is yellowish-green, obovoid or ellipsoid, hard, and five to six ribbed when dry. A seed is globose, generally 2–6 cm long, and pale yellow in color.

Flowering occurs in May–June, while fruiting occurs in winter (November–March).

Distribution

The species is found mostly in mixed dry deciduous forests and is frequent in tropical and subtropical zones, mostly in hilly tracks.

The plant prefers a tropical environment, ascending in the sub-Himalayas zones up to an elevation of 1500 m.

Climate and soil

In the natural habitat of the species, temperature ranges between 36 °C and 45 °C, and rainfall ranges from 1200 mm to 3000 mm per annum.

It is capable of growing on different types of soils but attains the best development on loose well-drained soils, such as sandy loam as well as clayey loam.

It grows in open areas in the forest, forming top to the middle canopy.

Propagation material

A seed is the most appropriate material for this plant’s propagation.

Fruit is collected in summer in May–June.

Generally, two good years are followed by one or two poor ones.

Fruits are collected when they turn yellow.

The seeds can be collected as soon as they fall on the ground, and are dried under shade. The seeds can be stored in gunny bags for one year, but fresh seeds germinate quicker.

Therapeutic Uses

The charter fruit is antiseptic, diuretic, astringent, cardiotonic, and febrifuge in action.

It is a safe and effective purgative, laxative, and alternative.

It is an important ingredient of ‘triphyla’, an Ayurvedic formulation used in the treatment of constipation, colic pain and kidney dysfunctions, eye diseases, and sore throat.

Unripe fruits are more purgative and the ripe ones are astringent.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *